Something for the weekend: Week 47, 2017

These are some longer things I’ve read this week. I don’t guarantee that they’re new, just that I found them interesting:

  1. Android at 10 part one, part two. As Android turns ten, Google is moving away from Linux and towards their own Fuchsia kernel. What might the next ten years of Android look like?
  2. Super Mario Odyssey review by Digitiser2000’s Mr Biffo. It sums up pretty much what I think about the new mechanics, and also calls out Mario for being a sexist pig. Don’t take this as virtue signaling, but yes, Nintendo might need to work on this when the only game starring Princess Peach is basically a pre-menstrual mood swing simulator with a far too easy  jump’n’run wrapped around it. You know, for girls! Girls can’t play video games! lololol!
  3. Google tracks and sells your location even if you’ve disabled location services. The surprise is probably that anyone’s surprised. Now that the company was caught red-handed doing this, will they promise to stop? I don’t think so, since Silicon Valley believes in “self-regulation” — thus no regulation at all. That we may have to thank Oracle for revealing this doesn’t make it any less bizarre.
  4. Microsoft appears to have lost the source code for parts of Office. And this is the same company that some governments trust with their sensitive data. Why doesn’t Microsoft publish all their software under a FOSS license? It’s like Linus Torvalds is rumored to have said, “Backups are for wimps. Real men upload their data to an FTP site and have everyone else mirror it.”
  5. Ideas were not enough. Not the reformation alone brought religious freedom to Western societies, but the fact that enforcing religious unity was becoming too expensive and politically cumbersome for the rulers.
  6. Stress can be good for you, but most toxic stress has measurable detrimental effects on your brain. The article explores the damage stress causes down to the physical level and gives some hints for post-stress recovery. Daily walks and meditation are mentioned. I’ve had episodes of stress and trauma leading to generalized anxiety (as the article also mentions) and I can say that meditation definitely can’t hurt.

I’d be delighted if some of that tickled your curiosity.

Play The Saboteur instead of Wolfenstein II

If you enjoy Nazi-stomping you’ve probably heard of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus. They did have a pretty funny marketing campaign, after all. Now according to the reviews I’ve seen so far, it’s a mixed bag. It’s the Doom engine meets the previous Wolfenstein’s setting. Something we’ve more or less seen before, just with better graphics. Not that terribly exciting on a conceptual level, is it?

This section of Paris will turn from black, white and red to color once you get rid of the Nazis

But there’s one game about taking out Nazis that is unique and was overlooked when it came out in 2009: The Saboteur. I’ll leave it to you to find in-depth reviews, but here are some of the things you can do:

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Facebook should be regulated, it is incapable of regulating itself

Directly from a Facebook employee formerly in charge of fixing the privacy issues of its developer platform:

[Facebook is] a company that reaches most of the country every day and has the most detailed set of personal data ever assembled, but has no incentive to prevent abuse

Read more at the New York Times.

This is a new trick I’m trying with simple short links to articles. Let me know if it’s annoying or fun.

Hollywood overreacts to its sex scandals

And this begs the question: Who decides what is moral, who decides whose work you are allowed to see?

Comedian Louis C.K. was recently involved in a sex scandal. He did not rape a woman, but he made several women watch him while he was masturbating. HBO reacted by removing Louie’s previous work from their HBOnow service and his film distributor has cancelled the distribution of Louie’s new film titled “I Love You, Daddy”

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Society needs to stop creating double niggers

I believe the origin of the term “double nigger” is in an old photoshopped Sonic comic, where Dr. Eggman is quite angry:

Have I lost you already? No? Good. I’d like to ramble about the deeper meaning that some people have defined for the term, and what it means for society.

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Outdoor Gaming Ep. 2

The sunlight was inviting, so I set out to gain a little altitude. Have a better view, better knowledge of where I am in this blasted valley and perhaps find out some details about the fish-frog people.

It did not take long for the first sign of their cult to appear beside the road. This time it was made out of iron and was much more intricately decorated than the wooden one I had last seen, so it was probably also more powerful:

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The only right way to work with Facebook is not to

If you are a Facebook user, the company not only knows where you are and with whom at all times, it also performs psychological experiments on you but never tells you, and keeps the results to itself. But if you’re a Facebook user, you knew that, right?

Maybe you thought Facebook provides some freedom to its users, is a democratic tool for communication that puts power into the people’s hands. Wrong again, as several recent reports show. Facebook is happy to work with corrupt and totalitarian governments and they have spying equipment more advanced than what’s in even the wettest, juiciest dreams of services like the FBI or CIA.

It collaborates with asshole governments, but there is no pattern to Facebook’s choice of allegiance. Sometimes  they assist with finding, jailing and torturing a person for their opinion. Sometimes they don’t. The process and reasoning behind it is completely opaque, and you as the person who might get tortured and jailed aren’t consulted about any of it.

It has its own censorship rules that are shared with no one. There is also some evidence that Facebook removes opinions it doesn’t like, things that don’t appeal to Silicon Valley. So by using Facebook, your opinion is automatically molded into that direction.

If that’s not enough, Facebook is not regulated. Things like the postal secret that protect your mail and telephone communications from prying eyes do not apply there. When you started using Facebook you actively signed away those rights by accepting the Facebook terms and policies.

The company is led by a man evidently out of touch with reality who even compares his creation with a new kind of church. And the latest move is to brainwash you while you use the site.

This is especially worrying because some companies in the last few years have decided their only online presence is through Facebook, and the only way to deal with customers is if they have a Facebook account. This is shortsighted, stupid, dangerous. Every year new details about the super-secretive company come to light, and it is becoming ever clearer that the only right way to use Facebook is not to use it at all.

8 years ago, I predicted someone would offer rentals of films still in theaters

And now Hollywood is getting ready to do it. The year I picked is off by only one or two. But the rest of my prophecy didn’t turn out that well. I underestimated the pricing; they want about 120% of the ticket price instead of the modest 10% markup I was thinking of.

Then I was pretty naive about DRM. I thought streaming would make studios less keen to use it, but as Netflix has demonstrated, the content mafia pushed things so hard that Microsoft even anchors DRM right to the OS for 4K Netflix in Edge.

At least I was partially right about DRM-free older games, but gog.com had existed in 2008 already so maybe I copied the idea from there. I’d still like studios to offer DRM-free older films online.

Keep in mind this was written from a European perspective. We don’t have ad-supported streaming platforms like Hulu, we can’t subscribe to things like HBO and we don’t get the channels’ own streaming platforms like Adult Swim or IFC. But none of those existed then either. Time moves quickly, I hope my next predictions are better.

Outdoor Gaming Ep. 1

Gamers spend way too much time indoors. And why is that? Because our gaming systems have screens that can’t be viewed outside! Yes, sometimes you see a gamer hunched over their super-reflective mobile phone screen, squinting and trying to make out what the hell is going on, playing a game in the park. It might work if they’re sitting in the shade of a tree, but it’s a very bad gaming experience in broad sunlight.

There are (or were) a few systems that can be played just fine outdoors, though. That even prefer strong sunlight: the Game Boy, Game Boy Color and Game Boy Advance all have transflective or reflective screens. So did the Neo Geo Pocket and Neo Geo Pocket Color. There was also the WonderSwan, but you can’t play any of those because Kelsey bought all of them. I’m ignoring the backlit Game Boy SP AGS-001 and Game Boy Micro for the purpose of this article, since what would be the point taking those into the sun?

Owning all those Game Boy iterations, I tried thinking of an excuse to avoid being outdoors and couldn’t, so I decided to work this the other way and actually go somewhere. Just take the first road I find and walk until I’m bored, but at least for an hour, then play some Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins.

Here’s the story, with pictures.

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The Dhammapada exploration – part 26: The Holy Man

Holy people, in religions, have it easy sometimes. In some they need to really work just one day a week, they have obedient little children doing most of the heavy lifting for them during service, and if they misbehave (or behave very well) they get sent to another part of the world for free and can explore that culture.

But Buddhism isn’t a religion, it has no rich organization overseeing things and no strict hierarchies. People in Buddhism, whether holy or not, should be working all the time. “Holy man” is also a shitty translation. What the Buddhist texts mean is “brahman”, in its original sense as used in India.

A brahman, be it woman or man, is highly accomplished in inner purity and self-control. Truly better than most. This isn’t something that you can simply learn in a Catholic priest seminary and then hang on your wall in the form of a certificate of ordination. This is something you work on for years, decades, maybe all your life without even attaining it.

So let’s hear about these interesting qualities in this twenty-sixth and final chapter of the Dhammapada.

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